Winner takes all?

Earlier this week, in an article in The Guardian, and during a BBC radio piece, Richard Sambrook, former head of BBC News and director of the Centre for Journalism at Cardiff University, warned that TV news audiences could fall by a third within a decade. 

Younger viewers are tuning in for just 25 hours a year. And, wait for it, older people, are increasingly adopting the digital habits of younger viewers and watching less TV news. This structural shift is not part of some dystopian future.

It’s part of a wave of change sweeping over the media industry.

Can you see anything?

Yes, wonderful things!

So said Carter, in response to Carnarvon, when, aided by the light of a flickering candle, he peered through a tiny breach in the top left hand corner of the doorway into the tomb of Tutankhamun.

As the crowds began to thin at the NAB Show, I had a similar experience.  This time aided by a great deal more light. And the view was every bit as spectacular as that which captivated Carter. Rough cut, beta, call it what you will, it was spectacular.

I saw something which could revolutionise our industry, and a lot more besides.

Analyze this

Be careful what you tweet.

Or, at least be careful what you tweet if you are a consultant, visit the IBM stand at the NAB Show, and hand over your twitter ID, in front of thousands of other people.

I was not so careful and, within seconds, a detailed analysis of my twitter behaviour was revealed on the screen in front of my (and many other) eyes. It was not pretty. 

The results were illuminating, not least to my fellow Marquis Partner who, frowning, began to make careful notes.

Winning in the attention economy?

A day of contrast today at the NAB Show in Las Vegas as the doors were flung open on the first day of the Exhibition. 

The floor, as ever, was filled to capacity with crowds marvelling at the latest broadcast technology on offer from all the expected vendors, the usual suspects.

But, will these vendors be the same next year, or in five years time? Or is something stirring in the woods?

Is bigger, better, faster the way. Or do we need to change gear, even change the road we are on?

Blending the right ingredients

The first of a series of (near) live posts from this year's NAB Show here in Las Vegas.

I promised to feature what's hot and what's not. Let's see if I can live up to that as the week unfolds.

Today's first post is a scene setter. Let’s call it my establishing shot. 

The exhibition component of the Show kicks off Monday. This morning the conference, or rather a series of curated conferences and (self styled) summits, got off to an early, and surprisingly well attended, start under the bright Vegas sun.

I chose to walk from my hotel to the conference centre. This immediately marked me out as a quirky out-of-the box thinker, or perhaps a mad Englishman out in the (pre) midday sun. No one walks here.

So, back to the conference. Saturday is a settling in day, the exhibition spaces are being prepped, the lines at Starbucks are packed with exhibitors taking a break, the lines for badges winding between here and the airport. My (perhaps) jet-lagged decision to rise early, and so turn up before 8am, meant I breezed by and picked up my badge without a line and even had time for a chat.

If I’m honest, I didn’t expect to take much away from this first day. But, I did. 

Three things.

Limitless opportunities - are you ready?

Change and transformation.

New horizons. New ideas. Mould breaking models and vibrant new ventures.

Will the hype surrounding this new year's NAB Show in Las Vegas truly reflect the current state of our industry?

The media and entertainment industry has become unleashed. Dynamic innovation and cutting-edge technologies are shattering the boundaries of content and opening up limitless opportunities.

Is it overblown hype or just scratching the surface? Can the changes sweeping our industry continue to surprise and delight us?

Make Love…Not War

Broadcasters across the globe are adopting the 1960s slogan ‘Make Love – Not War’ and using its essential message to underpin a revolution in the way they are organising their staff, technology and buildings. A new era of intense internal collaboration is being seen as a key tactic in their efforts to reduce costs, grow audiences and see off new competition. A recent survey by Marquis Media Partners LLP identified scores of TV, radio, print and online companies who have embarked on wholesale building moves and technical refreshes. Most of them are also preaching a gospel of vigorous co-operation between their different teams, departments and divisions in order to maximise the value of their investments.

Changing Times

Change is one of the most significant challenges that any organisation faces. The human condition is averse to change and even those who profess to be comfortable with it, often approach different or new tasks in a similar way. The processes in many organisations have hardly altered for years, however, with the arrival of digital technology new working practices, processes and interactions are now essential.

Organisations are now facing up to the changes imposed on them by digital technology affecting delivery, production, distribution and customer interaction. Additionally, with the emergence of new consumption methods like social networking and internet services, plus the introduction of alternative suppliers and business models, the ‘change challenges’ are magnified.